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Operation Blue Star.... and After

Operation Blue Star.... and After

Operation Blue Star.... and After

Rs.350
Product Code: 198401
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Preface of Book ...... More than 29 years have elapsed since the gruesome episode of Operation Blue Star, when the Indian Army had to overpower and eliminate armed Sikh radicals who had occupied and forti­fied the holy precincts of Golden Temple Amritsar and a few other Gurdwaras. It may have been a military success but without doubt it was a political disaster. This dark chapter in the history of Punjab has been overly chronicled. The market is flooded with books and articles on it. Why then another book on the subject? Among the large number of books there are only a handful authored by reputed journalists and writers, which present a comprehensive, dispassionate and well balanced account of the events. However, none of them were direct witnesses as all members of the press corps were asked to leave Punjab. Their accounts are- based on third party narratives. There were only two kinds of people who witnessed this unique operation directly, from their respective inclined perches -the members of the security forces who launched the Operation and the ones against whom it was launched. And the adversarys' accounts whether told through a third person or recorded by themselves cannot be taken as unbiased as they are bound to lean towards their respective sides. Not even the innocent pilgrims entrapped by the whirlwind of events could be termed as neutral; all of them were devout Sikhs. In his book entitled "Operation Blue Star-the True Story" General Brar's description of the events is detailed, accurate and truthful, but he too was under compulsion to justify the plan he himself evolved and executed. On the other hand publications that condemned the Operation, (without exception all Punjabi publications and also some in English) are written by those who were associates of Bhindraanwale at some stage or the other and were enamoured by his vision and views, or members of the Sikh clergy or Akali Dal; thus associated with the movement called 'Dharam Yudh'.